Join Our Newsletter
chc-x-grant-blog-cover.png

Brothers Redevelopment is pleased to announce that it has been awarded $400,000 from the Colorado Department of Law to combat housing instability in Colorado.

This funding will further support Brothers Redevelopment’s financial counseling services through its statewide housing helpline, Colorado Housing Connects (1-844-926-6632), by pairing financial coaching and counseling with existing programs that provide funds for rental and mortgage assistance.

Financial coaching empowers people to make smart decisions with money, overcome financial obstacles, and build a secure financial future. Customized to individual needs, financial counseling strategies are culturally sensitive, focused on outcomes and data, and administered by skilled professionals. In 2023 alone, Brothers Redevelopment provided financial counseling services to 196 Coloradans.

“We are honored to receive this funding and support from Attorney General Phil Weiser, the Colorado Office of Financial Empowerment, and the Colorado Department of Law. This funding will allow us to further our mission of providing essential support to individuals facing housing instability,” said Brothers Redevelopment President Jeff Martinez.

It’s not the first time that Brothers has teamed directly with the Colorado Attorney General’s Office to address the state’s most pressing housing challenges. During the foreclosure crisis of the early 2000s, the Attorney General’s Office served as a significant collaborator with the Brothers Redevelopment-managed Colorado Foreclosure Hotline — working together to resolve consumer complaints, identify predatory lenders and financial scammers. Brothers and the AG’s Office even teamed on an advertising campaign to encourage struggling homeowners to seek help.

As foreclosures have waned, Colorado Housing Connects has operated in partnership with the state through Brothers Redevelopment, offering a range of housing services to prevent evictions and foreclosures. Alongside financial counseling, Colorado Housing Connects provides vital eviction prevention services, ensuring immediate assistance. Additionally, for homeowners seeking guidance, Colorado Housing Connects offers HUD-approved housing counseling services to halt foreclosures.

Catering to a diverse range of inquiries, including renters, landlords, first-time homebuyers, older adults, individuals with disabilities, and those with fair housing concerns, Colorado Housing Connects logged over 47,700 contacts from Coloradans seeking housing assistance last year.

“This grant will supplement our efforts to empower neighbors statewide to achieve financial stability and secure housing,” said Colorado Housing Connects Director Patrick Noonan. “When families understand and control their finances, they unlock possibilities and reach new heights.”

Since 1981, Brothers Redevelopment has been a stalwart provider of financial counseling to Coloradans across the state. The agency’s financial counseling and coaching services offer personalized plans to navigate financial crises, develop strategies for self-resilience and stability, build credit, and identify resources for budget relief.

To learn more about Colorado Housing Connects or to submit an inquiry, visit coloradohousingconnects.org or call 1-844-926-6632.


347834053_651563262968955_6724589085856856007_n-1200x675.jpg

2023 was a year of groundbreaking initiatives, colorful transformations, and unwavering support for our community from Brothers Redevelopment.

We started the year with ambitious goals, fueled by our belief that everyone deserves a safe, decent place to live. We ventured into uncharted territories as we proudly unveiled Valor on the Fax — the nation’s only affordable housing community crafted for individuals with acquired brain injuries or related disabilities. And we tackled complex housing challenges head-on. From aiding those on the brink of housing insecurity to assisting older adults in maintaining their homes through essential repairs and modifications, we navigated through complexities with dedication and compassion.

The 42,277 individuals we had the privilege to serve this year are far more than mere statistics. They are families who got to keep their housing, individuals rediscovering hope and purpose, and older adults enjoying an enhanced quality of life.

As always, we at Brothers Redevelopment are thankful for the support of our partners, volunteers, donors, and others who allowed us to move onward and upward in 2023. Here’s a glimpse into some of the highlights that made our year so special.

Unveiling Valor on the Fax: A Milestone Celebration for Affordable Housing and Trauma-Informed Design 

Brothers Redevelopment President Jeff Martinez (middle) cuts the ribbon for Valor on the Fax, our newest affordable housing community for people with acquired brain injury and related disability.

A cornerstone of our year was the May unveiling of Valor on the Fax where our dedicated team, community leaders and valued partners/supporters gathered to celebrate the opening of the community.

TV cameras swarmed the rooftop patio of Valor to document the incredible milestone in Colorado’s housing landscape as figures like Brothers President Jeff Martinez, Brain Injury Alliance of Colorado CEO Kate Kerkmans, and others took center stage, articulating the pressing need for this revolutionary affordable housing complex. Shortly after, crowds swarmed to the front of Valor where Martinez and others finally cut the ribbon to open the new, 72-unit building.

Valor on the Fax, located at 7900 E. Colfax Ave., is the result of a collaboration between Brothers and the Brain Injury Alliance of Colorado. The supportive housing community provides services to tenants, their families, and providers while employing trauma informed design — meaning the building was designed to reduce symptoms of brain injury.

Our tenants at the community receive comprehensive services from the Brain Injury Alliance of Colorado, like resource navigation, job training, and recreational and wellness activities. Tenants also receive housing resources from Brothers like rent and utility assistance, homebuyer classes, and much more.

To learn more about this transformative community, visit http://valoronthefax.com/.

Brothers Property Management Expands Affordable Housing Impact Across Colorado, Welcoming New Communities in 2023 

In 2023, Brothers Property Management’s portfolio grew to offer more than 1,000 affordable units to families, youth experiencing homelessness, low-income older adults, and other Coloradans in need of affordable housing. Pictured is Greenway Flats at 31 W. Las Vegas St. in Colorado Springs which holds 65 units of permanent affordable housing for chronically homeless men and women. Brothers Property Management began overseeing Greenway Flats this year.

Our commitment to affordable housing reached new heights this year that extended beyond the opening of Valor on the Fax, thanks to our dedicated staff at Brothers Property Management.

This past year, Brothers Property Management’s portfolio has grown to offer more than 1,000 affordable units to families, youth experiencing homelessness, low-income older adults, and other Coloradans in need of affordable housing. In 2023, we were awarded new property management contracts to manage additional affordable housing communities in Aurora, Boulder, Denver, Lakewood, and Colorado Springs.

Notable new communities Brothers Property Management began overseeing this year include Alameda View Apartments, Greenway Flats, and SPARKwest.

Alameda View Apartments — located at 15501 E. Alameda Parkway in Aurora — is a 116-unit, Low Income Housing Tax Credit family community. Meanwhile, Greenway Flats at 31 W. Las Vegas St. in Colorado Springs holds 65 units of permanent affordable housing for chronically homeless men and women. And finally, SPARKwest in Boulder at 3215 Bluff St., boasts 45 units of permanent affordable housing.

Looking ahead, Brothers Redevelopment is preparing to bring a permanent supportive housing community to Arapahoe County that will provide housing and services to unhoused clients of the 18th judicial district problem solving courts, the Arapahoe County Pretrial Mental Health Program, Diversion clients of the 18th Judicial District Attorney’s Office, the Probation Mental Health Program, Project SAFER, Veterans Treatment Court, jail re-entry, and defendants being restored to competency.

Paint-A-Thon and Home Modification and Repair Services Continue to Thrive 

Brothers Redevelopment’s 45-year-old Paint-A-Thon Program painted 116 houses for older/disabled adults in 2023.

With every house we paint and every repair/modification we conduct, we’re not just enhancing physical spaces — we’re creating havens where families flourish and individuals thrive.

Thanks to the work of 2,621 volunteers, our Paint-A-Thon Program transformed 116 houses for low-income/disabled older adults in need. That is the most houses we have painted since 2019 when we also completed 116 projects through the service.

Simultaneously, our Home Modification and Repair Program expanded its reach into new jurisdictions, including Firestone, Boulder County, and beyond. This program, the longest of its kind in Colorado, is a vital force in preserving the homes of our older adults, allowing them to age gracefully. We completed 515 repairs/modifications in 2023, saving our clients more than $2 million.

Our Home Modification and Repair Program also further expanded the services we offer by introducing the Community Aging in Place, Advancing Better Living for Elders (CAPABLE) Program to Medicaid recipients in South Colorado Springs and Park, Teller, and El Paso counties. This zero-cost program is a client-directed home-based intervention designed to enhance mobility, function and the capacity to age in place.

CAPABLE consists of time-limited services in a series of visits from an occupational therapist, a registered nurse, and a technician from Brothers who work in collaboration with the program participant. Over a four-to-six-month period, these individuals visit the participant’s home.

A key component of this approach is having the participant drive the goal setting. The participant brainstorms strategies with team members to arrive at preferred ways to reach goals. Each action builds on the previous visits and focuses on the participants’ capacity to function at home.

If you or a loved one is interested in the CAPABLE Program, visit https://brothersredevelopment.org/capable/.

Colorado Housing Connects: Bridging Financial Gaps and Fostering Stability Amidst Housing Challenges 

A Colorado Housing Connects housing counselor teaches a homebuyer education workshop. Colorado Housing Connects offers several free housing classes to help residents understand how to find affordable housing, eviction prevention webinars, and homebuyer education workshops.

For many Coloradans, the thought of paying rent or mortgage brought anxiety and fear due to inflation, soaring housing prices, and the end of several pandemic-born assistance programs. But thankfully, our most vulnerable neighbors knew to turn to a valuable resource that has served the community through crisis after crisis.

Our statewide housing helpline, Colorado Housing Connects (1-844-926-6632), continued to show its value by serving 31,704 people in 2023. Our dedicated housing navigators and housing counselors connected clients to financial assistance, eviction/foreclosure prevention resources, and much more in 60 of Colorado’s 64 counties.

Through a variety of in-house resources, Colorado Housing Connects strived to advance housing stability throughout the state. We offered housing classes to help residents understand how to find affordable housing, eviction prevention webinars, and homebuyer education workshops. And we also provided tenant-landlord mediation assistance to nearly 600 households in Adams and Denver counties, helping to divert parties away from court-sanctioned eviction proceedings and to work toward mutually agreed alternatives between renters and landlords.

Outside of the incredible achievements by our Colorado Housing Connects team, our rental/mortgage assistance team worked tirelessly to distribute financial assistance to struggling Coloradans.

This year, Brothers provided nearly $9 million in rental, mortgage, and utility assistance to renters and homeowners throughout the state. We administered funds for several rental/mortgage assistance programs, including the City of Denver’s Temporary Rental and Utility Assistance Program and the City’s Foreclosure Financial Assistance Program. Additionally, our commitment extended statewide, contributing financial assistance to Coloradans offered through Colorado’s Emergency Rental Assistance and Emergency Mortgage Assistance programs.

We know rental/mortgage assistance is more than just that — we are assisting livelihoods and creating housing stability for all Coloradans.

Empowering Lives, Unlocking Savings: Brothers’ Aging in Place Program Redefines Well-being for Older Adult Households 

Brothers Redevelopment’s Aging in Place Program orchestrated an impressive $1,481,725 in cost savings, redefining well-being for our older adult clients. This figure captures the monthly benefits and services provided to our clients.

The monumental success of Brothers’ Aging in Place older adults services program is epitomized by its unparalleled impact on cost savings for older adult households.

This year, the Aging in Place Program has orchestrated an impressive $1,481,725 in cost savings, redefining well-being for our older adult clients. This figure captures the monthly benefits and services seamlessly provided to clients, resulting in a remarkable cumulative savings.

At the core of this service is the commitment to connect older adults with invaluable resources such as Medicaid, Social Security, food assistance, and rental/mortgage aid. These benefits and services, inherent rights for our clients, often eluded their grasp due to a lack of information. By bridging this knowledge gap, our program not only unlocks essential resources but more significantly, empowers older adults to claim the financial support they rightfully deserve. In doing so, Brothers’ Aging in Place Program stands as a beacon of empowerment, ushering in awareness, accessibility, and substantial savings for the older adults we proudly serve.

Brothers Redevelopment’s Visionary Path Forward: Unveiling the 2022-2027 Strategic Plan for Holistic Housing Solutions Across Colorado 

To kickoff 2023, Brothers released its 2022-2027 Strategic Plan, outlining four strategic priorities and fulfilling our vision of employing a holistic approach to eliminating barriers to stable housing for low-income community members, older adults and people living with disabilities across Colorado.

The strategic priorities of the plan include:

  • Growing a strong and stable presence across Colorado by responding to housing needs along the I-25 corridor; working with state and local leaders to identify gaps in services across the state; and focusing on housing challenges that Brothers is positioned to address.
  • Serving our neighbors through reliable and innovative programs by expanding in the provision and development of affordable housing; expanding the number of units that Brothers Property Management oversees to maximize revenue and build out the department’s capacity to facilitate growth and complexity in the portfolio; identifying opportunities for Brothers program expansion that will lend to enhance service provision and spur new opportunities for future funding/revenue; continuing to build and maintain capacity for strong stewardship; and helping marginalized and excluded communities gain access to stable housing.
  • Broadening our funding base by focusing on self-sustaining programs and diversifying our grants base and other funding sources.
  • Investing in and recognizing our team by increasing unifying activities for our staff; providing flexibility to accommodate varying employee needs in a changing workplace; and committing to inclusivity.

This new plan takes into account and builds upon the tremendous organizational growth and trends we’ve experienced since 2017 to lead us into a new era of impact that will see Brothers help tens of thousands of Coloradans in the near future.

The planning process was the most comprehensive of its kind in Brothers Redevelopment’s 52-year history and was meant to incorporate the views of various stakeholders to guide the implementation of our mission. Each priority has individual goals and metrics to measure progress. Those metrics will be evaluated with our Board of Directors monthly to ensure we are on track to meet the priorities of the plan and identify any areas of improvement.


CHC-Blog-cover-Instagram-Post.png

The holiday season is a time to gather with loved ones, share festive cheer, and create cherished memories. But for many, the financial burden of the holidays can cast a shadow over this joyous period.

Amid the hustle and bustle of gift-giving and holiday celebrations, it can be easy to overlook a looming rent date. If you find yourself struggling to make ends meet during this time, it’s important not to panic. There are several resources and strategies available to help you navigate challenging financial situations.

To provide expert guidance, Colorado Housing Connects (1-844-926-6632) Program Director Patrick Noonan answered common questions on managing rent payments during the holiday season. Here’s what he had to say.

With the holiday season approaching, many people may find themselves facing financial challenges. In your experience, what are some common reasons people struggle to pay their rent during this time?

After the holidays, it is common for us to hear from more people in need of help. There is a lot of pressure for families to spend more money around the holidays on gifts, food, and travel. Our clients also report earning less because they may lose hours at work during the holidays. It is tempting to spend on holiday expenses and want to figure it out later. However, too many people get burnt this way and find themselves struggling to make rent in January.

There are a number of things people can do to avoid this pitfall. For example, there are holiday food and toy drives that can help avoid overspending. There are also resources that can help with saving on other expenses like internet. If you can’t find ways to cut on holiday expenses, it can be helpful to figure out ways to increase your income during this time. Seasonal or gig work could be a good option. For resources to help with food and toy drives, low-cost internet programs, or workforce support, don’t hesitate to reach out to speak with one of our housing navigators or search on https://www.211colorado.org/.

If someone realizes they won’t be able to pay their rent, what are the first steps they should take in seeking assistance?

If someone is worried about paying their rent, they need to reach out for help as soon as possible. While financial assistance can be limited, it is critical that they explore their options immediately. Clients can find relief by seeking rental or utility assistance, working with a tenant-landlord mediator, learning about their rights through an eviction prevention legal workshop, or by seeking legal services. Clients can learn more by reaching out through our website https://coloradohousingconnects.org/renters-im-facing-eviction-and-need-help-with-my-rent/ or calling us at 844-926-6632.

How important is it for individuals to communicate with their landlords about their financial difficulties? 

A landlord is much more likely to work with a tenant experiencing a hardship when the tenant proactively communicates with the landlord. The earlier on a tenant starts this conversation, the more time they will have to work with their landlord on a resolution. Some tenants are able to negotiate a payment plan. If a tenant needs help communicating with their landlord, Brothers Redevelopment can provide free mediation in Adams and Denver Counties. Tenants in other counties that receiving certain public benefits may also be entitled to free tenant-landlord mediation.

In situations where individuals are facing possible eviction, what legal considerations should they be aware of?

It is important for tenants to know they have rights throughout the eviction process. If you receive a notice that your landlord is starting the eviction process it doesn’t mean that you need to move out right away. Take a deep breath and take some time to understand your rights. Consider attending one of our monthly eviction prevention workshops or seek legal aid.

What role does Colorado Housing Connects play in providing support to those struggling with rent payments?

Colorado Housing Connects can help point people to rent and utility assistance programs that may support those struggling to make ends meet. These resources change regularly, so it is important to reach out to get the latest information on what might be available. We offer support through tenant-landlord mediation in Adams and Denver Counties. You can also attend one of our monthly eviction prevention legal workshops. There are also a bunch of other resources available that our navigators can refer you to so you can meet your basic needs and breathe easier.

Beyond immediate assistance, what advice do you have for individuals to work towards more sustainable, long-term solutions for their housing and financial stability?

If you’re worried about affording your rent on an ongoing basis, we host regular affordable housing search workshops. We’ll talk about resources like subsidized housing, tax credit housing, affordable homeownership programs, and home sharing among other things. You can also meet with one of our housing counselors to assess your situation and learn what might be the best fit for you.

What final words of advice or encouragement would you like to share with individuals facing difficulty paying rent? 

It can be natural to panic or shutdown. It is important to take a deep breath and reach out for help. There are a number of things someone can do to avoid an eviction. Our navigators are happy to help you discuss your options.


tenant-landlord-mediation-blog-cover-3-1200x800.png

Brothers Redevelopment is bringing tenants and landlords together to resolve common lease disputes and to prevent evictions.

Qualifying Coloradans facing eviction are entitled to mandatory mediation at no cost, due to a bill passed by state lawmakers earlier this year. Colorado tenants facing eviction may qualify for mandatory mediation if they receive Supplemental Security Income, Social Security Disability Insurance, or cash assistance through the Colorado Works Program. Tenants are required to notify their landlord if they receive related benefits. Some exceptions apply including for tenants living in a home where the landlord owns less than six units.

Brothers Redevelopment offers free tenant/landlord mediation services in Denver and Adams counties. Our Denver tenant-landlord mediation program serves for all manner of housing disputes, including maintenance issues, lease disputes, security deposit disagreements, and more. Meanwhile, our Adams County tenant-landlord mediation services focus on diverting parties away from court-sanctioned eviction proceedings and to work toward mutually agreed alternatives between renters and landlords — including rental assistance, payment plans, lease compliance, and other solutions.

Mediation is an effective, confidential tactic that can both protect housing for those facing eviction as well as save landlords time and money. Tenants who can benefit from our tenant-landlord mediation services include Coloradans concerned about paying rent, renters who are worried that rental assistance won’t come soon enough, and those who are experiencing lease disputes or violations. Landlords who can benefit from our mediation services include those concerned about the costs associated with filing and completing an eviction, unit vacancy, turnover expenses, and the price of providing mediation.

“Through Brothers Redevelopment’s tenant-landlord mediation services, we are not just resolving disputes; we are fostering understanding and collaboration. Our aim is to bring tenants and landlords together, turning potential conflicts into opportunities for shared solutions,” said Colorado Housing Connects Program Director Patrick Noonan. “The recent legislation supporting mandatory mediation for qualifying Coloradans is a major change to the eviction process, and it’s critical tenants and landlords alike understand what this means. We believe in the power of mediation—confidential, effective, and transformative—to reach solutions that can de-escalate an eviction or housing conflict.”

Eviction filings have surged in 2023, surpassing pre-pandemic levels. The Denver Post reported that more than 9,200 Denver households have faced an eviction filing already this year — higher than the entirety of last year. The city is on track for more than 12,000 filings by the end of the year, the most since at least 2008.

Renters facing eviction, or landlords interested in learning more, should reach out to Colorado Housing Connects (1-844-926-6632) to speak to one of our navigators who will help walk them through resources as it relates to rental assistance and opportunities to participate in free tenant-landlord mediation.


chc-logo-no-number.png

Colorado’s only statewide housing helpline — Colorado Housing Connects (1-844-926-6632) — is hearing from more Coloradans in need of housing assistance more than ever before in the housing helpline’s 17-year history.

For thousands of callers, the assistance is urgent as they face an eviction or foreclosure due to falling behind on their rent or mortgage. In August, 8,073 inquiries were submitted to Colorado Housing Connects for housing assistance. Eviction prevention continues to represent the dominant need from Colorado Housing Connects’ clients followed next by affordable housing and tenant-landlord issues.

Still other callers are desperately searching for affordable housing as rents and inflation continue to climb across the state. Older adults are calling for urgent repairs that can help them in stay in their homes as winter approaches.

“It’s tempting to think that the upheaval of the pandemic is receding. The spike in calls for help we’re receiving says otherwise,” said Colorado Housing Connects Program Director Patrick Noonan. “It’s more desperate than ever before for a lot of the families we hear from. The threat of homelessness and displacement looms large for far too many people. Our team works incredibly hard to respond with the compassion and insight our clients need to make it through this influx of instability. It will only get more difficult for those struggling to make ends meet as student loan payments resume.”

The more than 8,000 inquiries represent a 60% increase in clients reaching out to Colorado Housing Connects compared to August 2022 when the housing helpline received 5,047 inquiries. Last month, 66% of inquiries submitted to Colorado Housing Connects were from Colorado renters seeking eviction prevention resources and rental/utility assistance.

The recent numbers even surpass those that the helpline received during the height of the Great Recession, when foreclosures reach an all-time high in Colorado.  At that time, calls peaked at just over 4,000.

“Our goal is to maintain our capacity to help during this current crisis,” Noonan said.  “People are desperate.”

A chart showing the increase in inquiries Colorado Housing Connects has received recently. Last month, Colorado Housing Connects logged 8,073 inquiries with eviction prevention continuing to be the dominant need.

Often working in partnership and collaboration with several state and local agencies, Colorado Housing Connects has been a beacon of hope for Coloradans during troubling times. Since the pandemic began, the CHC navigators have been focused on preventing evictions by connecting Coloradans rental and mortgage assistance and other long-term sustainable solutions, informing residents about the eviction process and their rights, and by connecting residents to legal referrals.

Brothers Redevelopment, the housing nonprofit that operates Colorado Housing Connects, offers a variety of other resources to struggling renters including Denver’s Temporary Rental and Utility Assistance Program. Since 2018, Brothers has administered more than $10 million in rental and mortgage assistance to neighbors across the state.

Those who are behind on rent or facing eviction are encouraged to contact Colorado Housing Connects to speak to an eviction prevention expert, apply for rental assistance, and to seek assistance with life’s other needs like food, medical needs, employee assistance, and more.


AdobeStock_496648239-1200x800.jpeg

The Denver Emergency Rental Assistance Program (ERAP) will stop accepting new first-time applications for assistance at 11:59 p.m. on Friday, Dec. 9.  

Recertification applications submitted prior to Nov. 1 and first-time applications submitted by Dec. 9 will continue to be processed. From June 2021 to Sept. 2022, Brothers Redevelopment administered more than $4 million in rental assistance to 819 Denver households. The need for rental assistance remains high — but limited funding is available to continue the program.  

According to the City of Denver’s Department of Housing Stability, the department is working to find ways to coordinate across Denver ERAP and Denver’s Temporary Rental and Utility Assistance Program (TRUA) to best serve residents during the transition from ERAP back to TRUA.  

Denver County residents seeking access to TRUA should call Colorado Housing Connects at 1-844-926-6632 to speak to a housing navigator to determine their eligibility and start the application process.  


hmr-july-1-1200x800.jpg

Throughout 2022, Brothers Redevelopment helped our neighbors across Colorado find solutions to their housing-related needs.

Once again, our organization prevented evictions and foreclosures across the state; saved older adults millions of dollars in cost savings from our Aging in Place senior services program; expanded Colorado’s largest and longest Home Modification and Repair Program; painted smiles on dozens of older adults through the Paint-A-Thon Program; saw the generosity of Coloradans through Kyle Clark’s Word of Thanks campaign on 9News; built and preserved affordable housing; and much, much more.

As we close out the year, here’s a look back at our accomplishments and milestones from 2022.

Brothers provides millions of dollars across the state to vulnerable renters 

The world appeared to return to as normal as possible in 2022 — but the ongoing impacts of the pandemic, combined with societal challenges like inflation, pricey rents, and an affordable housing shortage left many Coloradans in need of help.

Staff tasked with providing Rental and Mortgage Assistance answered the call and went above and beyond to keep Coloradans housed during tough economic times. This year, Brothers administered funds for rental assistance services programs, including Colorado’s Emergency Rental Assistance Program and the City of Denver’s Temporary Rental and Utility Assistance Program.

From June 2021 to November, Brothers provided over $9 million in rental assistance to 1,658 households in the state through the Emergency Rental Assistance Program. In Denver, the organization provided $396,797 in rental assistance and $15,682 in utility funds through the city’s Temporary Rental and Utility Assistance Program from January to September.

“You helped us over and over again this year. And frankly, we wouldn’t have survived this odd time without your help,” said Wendy Muhaisen — a resident who benefited from Brothers’ rental assistance services all throughout 2022.

Colorado Housing Connects (1-844-926-6632) expands services while receiving recognition at Eagle Awards 

These past few years have been very busy for Brothers’ statewide housing helpline, Colorado Housing Connects. But the helpline’s staff and housing counseling teams continued to work incredibly hard to advance housing stability across the state.

In 2022, Colorado Housing Connects proved to be an effective resource for Coloradans as the helpline received 50,670 inquiries from 60 of Colorado’s 64 counties. Coloradans received assistance with eviction/foreclosure prevention, tenant-landlord issues, housing counseling services, housing discrimination issues, and more.

Meanwhile, the helpline further equipped itself to address the region’s housing needs by launching tenant-landlord mediation programs in Adams County and Denver. The Adams County Tenant-Landlord Mediation Program works to divert parties away from court-sanctioned eviction proceedings and to work toward mutually agreed alternatives between renters and landlords like rental assistance, payment plans, lease compliance, and more. The Denver program serves for all manner of housing disputes — like maintenance issues, lease disputes, security deposit disagreements, and other disputes.

Colorado Housing Connects’ work has not gone unnoticed. In May, the helpline was awarded the Eagle Award from Housing Colorado — a non-partisan membership association dedicated to serving organizations and professionals in the affordable housing industry in Colorado.

The Eagle Award represents one of the highest achievements within the Colorado housing community and celebrates extraordinary accomplishments and outstanding leadership in housing and support services.

Aging in Place keeps/adds money to older adults’ pockets 

Cost savings is by far the biggest success that Brothers’ Aging in Place senior services program has brought to older adult households.

As of Oct. 22, the Aging in Place Program has provided $847,569.33 in cost savings to older adults. When we say the program has provided $847,569.33 in cost savings, we mean that in 2022, clients are receiving monthly benefits or services that amount to a total savings of $847,569.33.

Brothers’ Aging in Place Program connects older adults to resources like Medicaid, Social Security, food assistance, rental/mortgage assistance and more. These benefits and services are resources that our clients have a right to access. But often times, we’ve found that our clients simply did not have information about benefits and resources they are entitled to.

Older adults have suffered during these past few years, particularly when it comes to savings or income. According to a 2021 survey conducted by The Commonwealth Fund — an organization that works to promote a high performing health care system — around 19% of Americans age 65+ either used up all or most of their savings or lost a job/source of income because of the pandemic.

Resident Services helps tenants in our communities access resources 

While our Aging in Place program serves the broader community, Brothers’ Resident Services program serves the communities we own and manage with services to help residents who rely on us for a home.

For example, at Paris Family Apartments in Aurora — a community for families with children who have a household income at or below 60% of Average Median Income — our team brought birthday parties and presents to children, hosted National Night Out with the Aurora Police Department, and more.

In our senior communities, our residents were treated to potluck parties, performances and classes to help them manage their budgets.  As the holidays kicked, off, many residents at Brothers Property Management communities were also treated to turkeys, pies, and gift cards to King Soopers for Thanksgiving.

Home Modification and Repair Program continues expansion, fulfills Brothers’ mission 

It’s amazing what a repair or home modification can do for low-income older adults — just ask Colorado Springs resident Dean Reedy.

In February, Reedy’s pipes cracked, leaving him without running water for nearly a week. To get by, he used bottled water he purchased with food stamps to wash his hands and shower — until he got in touch with Brothers’ Home Modification and Repair Program. And after applying for the program, Reedy’s issues were quickly resolved when Brothers fixed his plumbing, installed a new shower and kitchen faucets, and replaced his water heater — all at no charge to him.

Reedy is one of 375 households who received services through the Home Modification and Repair Program in 2022. Brothers’ Home Modification and Repair Program is Colorado’s largest and longest running program of its kind. And it continued to grow in 2022 by expanding to cities like Aurora, Firestone, and Broomfield.

As the year closes, the program is planning to offer Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design to boost safety for local businesses. Examples of this work could be adding security cameras, installing better lighting, putting up a fence, or changing the landscape of a property.

The Home Modification and Repair Program catapulted into the local spotlight in April thanks to the work of 9News reporter Kyle Clark and his Word of Thanks — a micro-giving campaign that involves Clark presenting an organization he’d like to highlight on “Next with Kyle Clark” and asking viewers to consider a $5 donation.

Thanks to Clark and the generosity of “Next with Kyle Clark” viewers, the Home Modification and Repair Program received $42,474 in donations from 1,276 donors.

Painting smiles for low-income, disabled older adults  

There are a few reasons why the Paint-A-Thon has been so successful over the past 44 years.

Brothers has always been blessed with a caring volunteer department and volunteers who genuinely want to have an impact on the region’s low-income older adults. Those factors — combined with generous donors who support the Paint-A-Thon at Brothers’ annual Local Social fundraiser — are why Brothers was able to paint 94 homes in 2022 during its 44th Paint-A-Thon season.

The Paint-A-Thon had 1,945 volunteers this year who collectively spent 14,340 hours painting houses, doing yard, and visiting with Brothers’ older adult clients.

For a more thorough review of the 44th annual Paint-A-Thon, click here.

Polis takes in Valor on the Fax 

Colorado Gov. Jared Polis is no stranger to the impact Brothers has had on the affordable housing landscape in recent years.

In 2019, Polis and then U.S. Secretary of Housing and Urban Development Ben Carson joined Brothers President Jeff Martinez for the ribbon cutting of Paris Family Apartments. Three years later, Polis and Brothers’ paths would cross again — this time at the site of Valor on the Fax.

Polis, Lieutenant Gov. Dianne Primavera and other elected/public officials joined Martinez in April for an exclusive tour of Valor on the Fax —a 72-unit supportive housing community that will open in February for people facing housing insecurity because of acquired brain injury or related disability. Valor on the Fax is being developed by Brothers in partnership with the Brain Injury Alliance of Colorado — another nonprofit organization that serves people with brain injuries.

The supportive housing community will reside at 7900 E. Colfax and provide services to tenants, their families, and providers. Valor on the Fax is employing “trauma-informed design,” meaning that the building’s features are being created to reduce symptoms of brain injury.

The Brain Injury Alliance of Colorado will provide comprehensive services to Valor on the Fax tenants like resource navigation, job training and recreational and wellness activities. Meanwhile, Brothers will manage the community and provide housing resources to tenants like rent and utility assistance, homebuyer classes and more. Tenants will also receive housing vouchers to help them pay their rent.

Construction on Valor on the Fax is expected to be finished in early 2023.

 

 


IMG_0619-1200x800.jpg

Brothers Redevelopment congratulates the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) for celebrating its 10th anniversary of the Office of Housing Counseling.

In the past 10 years, Brothers’ housing helpline, Colorado Housing Connects (1-844-926-6632), has provided housing counseling services to over 20,000 clients throughout Colorado. Brothers employs HUD-certified housing counselors that went through certification to demonstrate proficiency in industry topics like the responsibilities of homeownership and tenancy, avoidance of foreclosure and eviction, financial management, and fair housing.

As a HUD-approved housing counseling agency, Brothers provides services to address a full range of housing counseling needs. Services include assisting homebuyers in evaluating their readiness for a home purchase and navigating the homebuying process, helping clients find affordable housing, offering financial literacy training, and providing foreclosure prevention counseling.

“It is easy to overlook just how involved housing counseling can be. When we hear from a client facing foreclosure, it isn’t about preserving an asset — it is about fighting for their home, the place where they meet their most basic needs, raise their family, and build their life,” said Colorado Housing Connects Program Director Patrick Noonan.

“Not only do our counselors respond to a client in crisis with empathy and compassion in each conversation, but they also pour hours into finding resolutions for a homeowner facing displacement. It is the small details that can determine whether a resolution is approved,” Noonan added. “Our counselors work incredibly hard to get the details right and to meet the client where they are in the moment.”

Brothers has provided housing counseling services since 1981. In 2006, the organization was selected by the Colorado Division of Housing to manage the Colorado Foreclosure Hotline. Through the hotline, Brothers brought together counseling agencies across the state to help hundreds of thousands of homeowners facing foreclosure. As a need for rental assistance grew, Brothers expanded the Colorado Foreclosure Hotline in 2014 to cover all housing topics — leading to the launch of Colorado Housing Connects.

During the COVID-19 pandemic, Brothers teamed up again with the Colorado Department of Local Affairs and the Colorado Division of Housing to launch the Housing Counseling Assistance Program. Funded by the Colorado Department of Local Affairs, the program involves Brothers collaborating with numerous housing counseling and legal services in Colorado to assist residents with comprehensive housing counseling, housing navigation and eviction prevention.

The service is free to all Coloradans and operated through Colorado Housing Connects. Among the housing counseling and legal services who are involved in the program include Boulder County, Douglas County Housing Partnership, NEWSED, Denver’s Southwest Improvement Council, and others.

To access Brothers’ housing counseling services, call Colorado Housing Connects at 1-844-926-6632 or visit coloradohousingconnects.org.

“Whether it was helping homeowners through the foreclosure challenges of the 2012 housing crisis, responding to the housing needs of victims of disasters, or the continuing housing relief and recovery resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic, housing counselors have been there over the last decade to support families in making critical housing choices and equipping themselves for the future,” said HUD Deputy Assistant Secretary for Housing Counseling David Berenbaum in a statement. “This month, we recognize not only our role in helping people stay in their homes during times of crisis, but also in supporting a network of HUD Certified Housing Counselors who serve some 3,000 clients a day.”


AdobeStock_331432520-1200x768.jpeg

 

The Colorado Emergency Rental Assistance Program will no longer process new requests for additional assistance/recertification on Oct. 21 at 11:59 p.m. and will stop accepting new applications in mid-November. But Brothers Redevelopment’s services aren’t going anywhere.

Since June 2021, Brothers has provided over $9 million in rental assistance to 1,658 households in the state through the Emergency Rental Assistance Program. The agency also serves Denverites by administering funds for Denver’s Temporary Rental and Utility Assistance Program — a financial resource available to Denverites. From January to September, Brothers has provided $396,797 in rental assistance and $15,682 in utility funds through the program.

Outside of financial assistance, Brothers’ housing helpline, Colorado Housing Connects (1-844-926-6632), has also been a beacon of hope for struggling Coloradans. The helpline received 35,246 inquiries from 59 of Colorado’s 64 counties in 2021. Callers received assistance with eviction/foreclosure prevention, tenant-landlord issues, housing counseling services, housing discrimination issues, and more.

If you’re concerned about paying rent in the coming months, here are some resources from Brothers that can help you keep your housing.

Rental Assistance

Denver County residents seeking rental assistance through the City of Denver’s Temporary Rental and Utility Assistance Program should call Colorado Housing Connects to speak to a housing navigator to determine their eligibility and start the application process.

Those who live outside of Denver County can still apply for the Emergency Rental Assistance Program if they’re new applicants until mid-November. To apply for the emergency rental assistance program, click here.

Colorado Housing Connects

Colorado Housing Connects is available to all Coloradans throughout the state and provides information on housing services and topics of interest to renters, landlords, first-time homebuyers, older adults, people with disabilities, and anyone with fair housing concerns.

The helpline works with renters to prevent evictions by connecting clients to local rental assistance resources, informing renters about the eviction process and their rights, and by helping renters access legal referrals.

Since 2020, Colorado Housing Connects has also offered free eviction prevention webinars in which housing/legal experts cover the eviction process, renter rights and rental assistance resources. To find the next webinar, click here.

Renters seeking assistance can contact Colorado Housing Connects at 1-844-926-6632 or by visiting coloradohousingconnects.org.

Tenant-landlord Mediation Services

Colorado Housing Connects offers free tenant-landlord mediation to residents in Adams and Denver counties.

The Tenant-Landlord Mediation Program in Adams County was designed for the purpose of creating housing stability in the county. Trained mediators facilitate high-quality, non-cost mediation services to mitigate landlord-tenant disputes in Adams County. The goal of tenant-landlord mediation is to divert parties away from court-sanctioned eviction proceedings and to work toward mutually agreed alternatives between renters and landlords — like rental assistance, payment plans, lease compliance, and more.

In Denver, Colorado Housing Connects offers tenant-landlord mediation services for all manners of housing disputes — including maintenance issues, lease disputes, security deposit disagreements, and more.

Medication can help protect housing for struggling residents and is confidential. Among those who can benefit from the tenant-landlord mediation include those who are concerned about paying rent, residents who are worried that rental assistance won’t come soon enough and those who are experiencing lease disputes or violations.

Those who are interested in tenant-landlord mediation services can learn more information by calling Colorado Housing Connects or by submitting a web inquiry at coloradohousingconnects.org.


Colorado-Connects_Vector_Rebuild-1-1200x500.png

Earlier this year, Kesha moved nearly 1,300 miles away from her Michigan home with her two teenage children to live with her oldest son in Colorado Springs.

But after her family split ways, Kesha and her children suddenly found themselves homeless for eight months in a new part of the country. The family stayed at different motels and couch surfed to stay afloat. But the burden of struggling with homelessness was larger than having unstable housing — it contributed to a negative effect on Kesha’s mental health.

“It was tough, it was really tough. It added to depression, it caused depression,” Kesha said. “It was kind of unreal to just have something like that up and happen all of a sudden.”

While seeking resources that could help her find housing, Kesha was referred to Brothers Redevelopment’s statewide housing helpline, Colorado Housing Connects (1-844-926-6632). And thanks to that connection, she began working with Colorado Housing Connects Housing Counselor/Navigator Katrina Brown who took Kesha under her wing.

Brown helped Kesha and her children access security deposit assistance for an apartment along with finances for her first month of rent so that the family could finally have a stable housing situation. She also assisted the family in accessing food assistance, furniture for their new apartment and even recruited her friends to donate gift cards to Kesha for places like Walmart and Target.

“When I say Colorado Housing Connects basically helped us with everything, I really mean it. It was comforting to know that we had someone in our corner, and we weren’t going to go through everything alone,” Kesha said.


2250 Eaton St., Suite B,
Denver, CO 80214

Main Phone Number: 303-202-6340
CHC Phone Number: 844-926-6632
Brothers Property Management:
877-751-9990
TTY 711
info@brothersredevelopment.org

Copyright Brothers Redevelopment Inc. 2013-2024. All rights reserved.

Sitemap | Privacy Policy

Our ongoing accessibility effort works towards being in line with the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) version 2.2, levels A and AA criteria. These guidelines not only help make web content accessible to users with sensory, cognitive, and mobility disabilities but ultimately to all users, regardless of ability.

This website is just part of a meaningful change in making all State of Colorado services inclusive and accessible. We welcome comments on how to improve this website’s accessibility for users with disabilities and for requests for accommodations to any State of Colorado services.